Category

Archives

Activation of anaphase-promoting complex by p53 induces a state of dormancy in cancer cells against chemotherapeutic stress

Cancer dormancy is a stage in tumor progression in which residual disease remains occult and asymptomatic for a prolonged period. Cancer cell dormancy is the main cause of cancer recurrence and failure of therapy. However, cancer dormancy is poorly characterized and the mechanisms of how cancer cells develop dormancy and relapse remain elusive. In this study, 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) was used to induce cancer cell dormancy. We found that cancer cells escape the cytotoxicity of 5-FU by becoming "dormant". After exposure to 5-FU, residual non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), followed by mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). These EMT-transformed NSCLC cells were in the state of cell quiescence where cells were not dividing and were arrested in the cell cycle in G0-G1. The dormant cells underwent an EMT showed characteristics of cancer stem cells. P53 is strongly accumulated in response to 5-FU-induced dormant cells through the activation of ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and TGF-β/Smad signaling. In contrast to the EMT-transformed cells, MET-transformed cells showed an increased ability to proliferate, suggesting that dormant EMT cells were reactivated in the MET process. During the EMT-MET process, DNA repair including nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) is critical to dormant cell reactivation. Our findings provide a mechanism to unravel cancer cell dormancy and reactivation of the cancer cell population.

Related Products

Cat.No. Product Name Information Publications Customer Product Validation
S2704 LY2109761 LY2109761 is a novel selective TGF-β receptor type I/II (TβRI/II) dual inhibitor with Ki of 38 nM and 300 nM in a cell-free assay, respectively; shown to negatively affect the phosphorylation of Smad2. (28) (5)

Related Targets